Adventure Abounds on the Wild Africa Trek

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When my friends and I were planning our most recent trip to Walt Disney World, we realized we could take advantage of the introductory rates for a new backstage tour being offered called the Wild Africa Trek.  We were all really excited to participate since the tour started the month before with rave reviews from guests.  The trek is an experience guests may reserve for an added cost (depending on the season) which brings up to 12 people back stage at Disney’s Animal Kingdom.  Before I get to all of the fun details about the tour, there are few things people should know about it.

Folks who are considering the tour should be forewarned there is quite a bit of walking on uneven pathways.  There is also a weight limit in order to ensure your safety using the harness equipment (the cast members will weigh you at the start of your tour).  If you have a fear of height, you may not want to sign up for the trek.  Everyone must walk across rope bridges along the way.  Once you have decided to sign up, make sure you dress properly with sturdy sneakers, sunscreen, and all that good stuff.  One last tidbit: there is no bathroom access for a couple of hours so watch your liquid intake that morning.  Now that we have all of those warnings out of the way, let me tell you all about my Wild Africa Trek.

Our tour began before the park opened for the day.  We had a car so we did not have to worry about the bus schedule.  If you opt to use Disney transportation to get to the park, you may consider taking a cab at that hour of the morning to eliminate any added hassle.  Since we arrived before park opening, a guide was waiting for us at the main gate to take our names and then escort us to the area where the trek begins.  This area includes lockers where guests can stow their stuff they won’t be taking on the actual tour.  You should know you are not permitted to take anything which you cannot attach to your body due to the psychical activity required (you may take your camera if you can clip it onto your provided vest or wear it around your neck).  Bulky items like backpacks will also not be allowed to come with you since they would get in the way of your harness equipment.

Preparing for our trek! Photo by Deanna Simmons

A group picture before we got started

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After stowing your belongings, you will be fitted with a harness for the first half of the trek.  It is not flattering, it isn’t the most comfortable thing in the world, but it is for your safety.  When you are all suited up in your harness, you will be asked to take a practice run on a small rope bridge.  Your guides will try to get to know you a bit at this point before you begin. One of these guides will have a camera and will photograph your group throughout your tour.  A great feature of the Wild Africa Trek is that guests are provided a code for a free photo pass CD with all of the photos the guide takes.

Photo by Neil Citro

Photo by Neil Citro

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo by Deanna Simmons

The first portion of the tour is dedicated to the jungle.  Like most things at Disney World, there is a storyline for the tour.  If you are familiar with the  storylines associated with the Pagani Forest Exploration Trail and the Kilimanjaro Safaris attraction, the spiel given by your guides will sound familiar.  After walking through the African village of Harambe, guests are lead into the Pagani Trail to get a closer look at a few animals like gorillas before heading backstage.  Here there is a bit of a hike through a wooded area with a stop to look over the edge of a small cliff at the hippo habitat.  There is a bit more hiking until folks arrive at one of the highlights of the day: rope bridges over the hippos and Nile crocodiles.

 

Photo by Elisabeth O'Brien

There are two bridges guests must cross to continue on with their journey.  They are made of rope and wood planks which are designed to look weathered and worn.  Your guides will give you some safety instructions, assist you with attaching your harness to the safety equipment, and then you’re off!  The bridges give you a great view of the animals if you are brave enough to look down.  It was a blast to watch my friends cross the bridges, especially those who were a bit afraid.  With some encouraging words, everyone made it across!

Crocodile from the rope bridge. Photo by Neil Citro

After the second bridge, the jungle portion of the tour begins to wind down and eventually guests are led to a truck waiting to take them out into the savannah for the second portion of the tour.  We were able to get a great view of several animals on the savannah that day.  Our guide stopped on occasion so we could take pictures and ask questions.  There were also binoculars on board the truck for us to use to get a better look at some of the more reclusive residents of the Animal Kingdom.

 

Here are some pictures of my friends and I crossing the bridges:

 

Photo by Steven Bassett

 

Photos from our savannah vehicle:

Photo by Elisabeth O'Brien

Photo by Colin O'Brien

Photo by Deanna Simmons

Photo by Deanna Simmons

After cruising around the savannah for a while, we were brought to the Boma (an area to take a break, have some food, and use the rest room).  This structure offers fantastic views of the savannah!  We were able to relax for a while, enjoy some yummy food, and take in the beauty of our surroundings.  Our time here was really enjoyable, especially since we were lucky enough to have a gorgeous day.  Food brought in from the Tusker House restaurant is provided at the Boma.  The African inspired menu changes based on the time of day.  Since our tour started early in the morning we were given a selection of breakfast items.  While there were a few things that were not my favorite just based on personal taste, I thought the food was great!  If you are a light eater, you could probably make a meal out of the trek’s munchies, but others may find their stomachs grumbling a couple hours later.

 

 

 

 

 

After our snack we were able to hang out and enjoy the view of the savannah for a while longer before piling back in the truck, checking out a few more animals, and returning to the area where we started.  When we arrived back at the beginning, we were informed a donation to the Disney’s Wildlife Conservations Fund would be made on our behalf which I thought was a nice gesture.  After retrieving our belongings for the lockers, we took one last group shot before wrapping things up.

Our trek lasted about three hours when all was said and done.  I really loved this experience!  Our guides were fun, kind, and knowledgeable and they really added to our tour.  The opportunity to get a better look at some of the animals seen on the Kilimanjaro Safaris attraction was a real treat.  Adding in the adventurous elements of hiking and tackling the rope bridges made this an unforgettable morning.  With all that being said, I’m not sure I would pay $249 charged during peak season.  If your travel plans are flexible enough, I think the regular $189 price tag is reasonable especially since a photo pass CD is included.

What about you?  Have you tried the Wild Africa Trek?  Dying to try it? Let me know what you think!

If you’d like to see more pictures of the Wild Africa Trek check out our blogger JL’s post about her experience!

Next week I’ll be back to discuss preparing for a trip to WDW since I’ll be in the midst of getting ready for my next one!

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Posted on April 27, 2011

19 Responses to “Adventure Abounds on the Wild Africa Trek”

  • by Doug (@disdug71) on April 27, 2011, at 11:01 am EDT

    Nice post Kristen! Brings back allot of memories. I think at the $189 price point the trek was worth it. It is an experience you can only get by doing the Wild Africa Trek. At $249 it gets a little tougher for me to consider doing it again.

  • by Aaron Newton on April 27, 2011, at 1:55 pm EDT

    Getting the Photopass CD is a nice feature that does ameliorate some of the cost concerns, but that’s a proposition that loses some of the value as clearly every person in my family doesn’t need their own CD. I’d like to do it… if it was just me I’d probably find some way to justify it, but as the cost climbs with the size of the family, I’m just gonna try to not think about it. ^^;

    • Hi Aaron! I completely understand the cost concerns for an entire family. You should also keep in mind that this tour is only available to people over 16 (I’m not sure how old your kids are). Our tour was made up of 9 people from my group and three from another. The other group bought the trek for their daughter as her birthday gift which I thought was a nice idea for a teenage girl. I hope some day you get to try it out one way or another! Thanks so much for reading and commenting!

  • by Erin Foster on April 27, 2011, at 3:54 pm EDT

    Love the Wild Africa Trek. I’ve done it twice!

    To clarify for future readers: The actual age requirement is 8 years old. I took my 11-year-old twins on the Trek and they had a great time. A friend who took her 8 and 11 year old sons on the Trek was similarly impressed. They actually have child versions of the meal if you request.

  • I’m dying to try the trek! Thanks for your detailed review. Helps answer some of the questions I had.

  • As usual, Kristen, you’ve done a great job sharing the experience on a blog post!

    We experienced the Trek in January and absolutely loved it. I’d do it again, in a few years–or sooner if we manage to bring a niece or nephew down for a WDW visit any time soon. We were too scared to take our cameras, though, because of the high probability of rain. Next time, we’ll take the cameras and bring some zip-loc bags if it looks like rain.

  • Thanks so much, Janet! I’m glad you had a great time on the trek too! It sounds like a fun idea to bring a niece or nephew a few years down the road. I didn’t bring my camera either since I wouldn’t be able to attach it somehow. However, a bunch of my friends did so I’ve been able to enjoy their photos. The added bonus of the photo pass pictures has been nice too. Thanks for reading and commenting!!

  • by Chris Young on April 28, 2011, at 4:12 pm EDT

    I understand there is a weight limit, and I understand why. However I’m a big girl, healthy and active – just a big girl…what are the weight limits?

  • by Chris Young on April 28, 2011, at 4:23 pm EDT

    What are the weight limits for this adventure? I’d love to do it, but I can’t find this info listed anywhere. Thanks!!!

    • Hi Chris! The weight requirements are 60-310 lbs. When the CM weighs guests the scale is not revealed to everyone around, and the CM does not announce the weight. When he weighted me he simply said “very good” and I hopped off the scale. The idea of being weighed didn’t thrill me either, but they did it in the best possible way. I hope this helps!

  • by Chris Young on April 28, 2011, at 4:24 pm EDT

    Sorry for the double post! :)

  • Thanks for the great review. I’m making my first visit to Disney World this week, and have reservations for the Africa Trek for Friday morning with my 14 y.o. nephew, 10 y.o. niece, and sister-in-law. Now I’m really excited!

  • by Michele Guilford on July 6, 2011, at 11:44 pm EDT

    My husband and I went on this trek in February for our 25th Anniversary. We had a good time but felt that it was not worth the cost at all. It was basically a duplicate of the pagnani trail and kilamanjaro safari which is included in your admission price. Yes we did walk thru the woods, leaned over a ledge to see animals, walked across a bridge and had lunch on the savannah, but it was not what we expected. I could see the animals up closer at the Animal Kingdom Lodge where we stayed. I guess I just expected more for the cost, but we did have fun.

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