Posts Tagged ‘monsters inc’

How to Get Your Joke Told at the Monsters, Inc. Laugh Floor

by on November 30, 2013

Of the many ways to participate in the shows and attractions at Disney World, one of the easiest is getting a joke included in the Monsters, Inc. Laugh Floor attraction at the Magic Kingdom. Here’s how to make it happen.

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When you enter the Laugh Floor attraction, you’ll first be placed in a holding room pre-show area with several TVs hanging from the ceiling. The screens will give a message which states, “Text Your Joke Now to 12345″ (12345 is a placeholder, the actual number varies from show to show) and gives the following instructions:

  1. Start your text with the word (rotating key word).
  2. Include your first name and hometown so we can thank you!
  3. If chosen, your joke will be performed in the show and you’ll be famous.* (*Famous in monster world only. Human world fame may vary.)

While these instructions seem pretty simple, lots of folks fumble them. A common mistake is forgetting to include the show-specific key word. Without the key word, they don’t know that you’re actually at the theater and they won’t include your joke. Follow instructions and you’re ahead of the game already.

While sending a text is simple enough, the other critical part of getting your joke included in the show is sending in a good joke. In my unscientific study of a dozen shows, I’ve noticed a pattern in the jokes that were selected for inclusion. Jokes used during the show are typically short (they have to fit in a text, duh), use G-rated language, have a teeeeeny gross-out factor, or include a pun or Disney character reference. Bonus points if there’s a teeny gross-out, a pun, and a Disney reference!

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Movies to Watch Before You Visit Disney World

by on November 20, 2013

For many children, and adults, Walt Disney World can be an overwhelming place, filled with countless new sights, sounds, smells, textures, in an endless stream of stimuli. Sure you can surprise your family with trip to Walt Disney World, but you may have a better overall vacation experience if you give your kids some time to prepare in advance. At-home preparation for you kids might take the form of meeting costumed characters, practicing table manners, or learning to sleep in a particular crib, but one of the easiest, and most effective, ways to get a child ready for a Disney vacation is to show him movies related to your upcoming trip.

Cinderella is a must see before visiting Walt Disney World.

Cinderella is a must see before visiting Walt Disney World.

You’ll have a better understanding and appreciation of what’s happening in the parks if you’re familiar with the stories depicted in what you see there.

Some of these suggestions will be obvious. Your child will no doubt have a better grasp on something like the Monsters, Inc. Laugh Floor if he’s, you know, actually seen Monsters, Inc. Other suggestions will be more tangentially related to specific attractions, but will give a your kids a greater comprehension of the tone and flavor of Walt Disney World.

As always, use these recommendations with the caveat that you are the best judge of what’s appropriate for your specific child and his current developmental stage. For example, while most preschoolers will adore The Little Mermaid, a child who’s in fear-of-the-ocean mode might have a full-scale meltdown at the sight of Ursula. Similarly, some kids might be ready for a Star Wars marathon at age four, while others will need to wait until eight, nine, or even older. If there’s a movie that you haven’t seen since your own childhood, it might be worth doing a quick preview on your own before subjecting your child to potential overload.

You’ll no doubt note that many Disney and Pixar films are not mentioned on my list (Bambi, Hercules, Hunchback of Notre Dame, Up, etc.). This bears no reflection on the quality of the films, nor on their place in the canon, but rather speaks to their current relative lack of representation at the Walt Disney World parks and resorts. There are also a few non-Disney films listed here because, in my opinion, they do a particularly good job of evoking an atmosphere or time period represented at the parks in a more succinct way than any actual Disney film does.

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Southern California’s Top Five Dark Ride Illusions

by on September 17, 2013

Images copyright Disney

Recently, Disneyland’s Indiana Jones Adventure was unexpectedly upgraded with digital projection mapping effects that bring the opening scene’s Mara statue to life in a dynamic new way. The “plussing” of the attraction was somewhat controversial online due to the replacement of the original accompanying audio track (which was never voiced by James Earl Jones, contrary to urban legend), but the Internet buzz shouldn’t overshadow how welcome it is that Imagineering is still improving an eighteen year old E-Ticket.

That brings up the importance of the special effect, or “illusion,” in the art of the dark ride. (For the purposes of this post, “dark ride” refers to attractions where guests travel in a vehicle through a series of largely indoor environments that feature scenery and visual effects.) Dark rides predate Disneyland but were perfected by the Mouse; while a few competitors can now go toe-to-toe with Disney’s attractions in the awe-inspiring technology department, the Anaheim resort still houses the world’s greatest collection of ride-through theatrical illusions, featuring some “wow” moments that still draw gasps generations after their invention.

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